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Facilitators:

Kimberle Crenshaw (U.S)

Kimberlé Crenshaw, Professor of Law at UCLA and at Columbia Law School, is a leading authority in the area of Civil Rights, Black feminist legal theory and race, racism and the law.  Her articles have appeared in the Harvard Law Review, National Black Law Journal, Stanford Law Review and Southern California Law Review. She is the founding coordinator of the Critical Race Theory Workshop and the co-editor of the volume, Critical Race Theory: Key Documents That Shaped the Movement. Professor Crenshaw has lectured widely on race matters, addressing audiences across the country as well as in Europe, India, Africa and South America. A specialist on race and gender equality, she has facilitated workshops for human rights activists in Brazil and in India and for constitutional court judges in South Africa. Her groundbreaking work on “intersectionality” has traveled globally and was influential in the drafting of the equality clause in the South African Constitution. Crenshaw authored the background paper on Race and Gender Discrimination for the United Nation’s World Conference on Racism, served as the Rapporteur for the conference’s Expert Group on Gender and Race Discrimination and coordinated NGO efforts to ensure the inclusion of gender in the WCAR Conference Declaration.

Crenshaw has worked extensively on a variety of issues pertaining to gender and race in the domestic arena including violence against women,, social justice organizations and corporations to advance their race and gender equity initiatives. structural racial inequality and affirmative action.  She has served as a member of the National Science Foundation’s committee to research violence against women and has consulted with leading foundation.

Twice awarded Professor of the Year at UCLA Law School, Crenshaw received the Lucy Terry Prince Unsung Heroine Award presented by the Lawyers Committee on Civil Rights Under Law and the ACLU Ira Glasser Racial Justice Fellowship 2005-2007.  She has researched and lectured widely in Brazil as the Fulbright Distinguished Chair for Latin America and is the recipient of the 2008-2009 Alphonse Fletcher Fellowship.  She is currently a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University.

Luke Harris (US)

Dr. Luke Charles Harris is the former Chair of the Department of Political Science at Vassar College, where he teaches American Politics and Constitutional Law; and the Co-founder of the African American Policy Forum (Policy Forum). The Policy Forum was developed as part of an ongoing effort to promote women’s rights in the context of struggles for racial justice. It is a media-monitoring think-tank and information clearinghouse that works to bridge the gap between scholarly research and public debates on questions of inequality, discrimination and injustice.Harris earned a B.A. at Saint Joseph’s University, a J.D. and an LL.M at Yale Law School, and a Ph.D. in Politics at Princeton. He clerked for the late A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., the distinguished legal historian and former Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit; served for two years as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Warwick, School of Law in Coventry England; for one year as a Lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania in the Department of Sociology; and for two years as a junior associate in the Litigation Department at Simpson, Thacher and Bartlett in New York City, before beginning his teaching career at Vassar in 1992.

An expert in the field of Critical Race Theory, Harris has authored a series of important essays on questions of racial and gender equality in contemporary America; and was the co-writer and chief consultant for Kathe Sandler’s 1993 award-winning documentary film, A Question of ColorA Question of Color premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival and was released theatrically at the Film Forum in New York City before being aired on nationwide TV by PBS in 1994. It is currently being distributed by California NewsReel.

In 2003, Harris supervised and coauthored an amicus curiae brief on behalf of the “Committee of Concerned Black Graduates of Accredited Law Schools” in a landmark Supreme Court case: Grutter v. Bollinger (see “Prologue: Brief of Amici Curiae on Behalf of Concerned Black Graduates of ABA Accredited Law Schools,” Michigan Journal of Race and Law 2004). More recently, his ground breaking essay, “Affirmative Action as Equalizing Opportunity: Challenging the Myth of Preferential Treatment,” coauthored with Uma Narayan, was republished in Hugh LaFollette’s, Ethics in Practice, Blackwell Press (Oxford England), 3rd edition, 2006.  For the academic year of 2008/2009, Prof. Harris was nominated a senior fellow at the Stanford Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. During his residency, one of his scholarly projects will be the completion of a book entitled, The Meaning of Equality in “Post-Apartheid” America.

Dr. Luke Charles Harris is the former Chair of the Department of Political Science at Vassar College, where he teaches American Politics and Constitutional Law; and the Co-founder of the African American Policy Forum (Policy Forum). The Policy Forum was developed as part of an ongoing effort to promote women’s rights in the context of struggles for racial justice. It is a media-monitoring think-tank and information clearinghouse that works to bridge the gap between scholarly research and public debates on questions of inequality, discrimination and injustice.

Harris earned a B.A. at Saint Joseph’s University, a J.D. and an LL.M at Yale Law School, and a Ph.D. in Politics at Princeton. He clerked for the late A. Leon Higginbotham, Jr., the distinguished legal historian and former Chief Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit; served for two years as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Warwick, School of Law in Coventry England; for one year as a Lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania in the Department of Sociology; and for two years as a junior associate in the Litigation Department at Simpson,, before beginning his teaching career at Vassar in 1992. Thacher and Bartlett in New York City

In 2003, Harris supervised and coauthored an amicus curiae brief on behalf of the “Committee of Concerned Black Graduates of Accredited Law Schools” in a landmark Supreme Court case: Grutter v. Bollinger (see “Prologue: Brief of Amici Curiae on Behalf of Concerned Black Graduates of ABA Accredited Law Schools,” Michigan Journal of Race and Law 2004). More recently, his ground breaking essay, “Affirmative Action as Equalizing Opportunity: Challenging the Myth of Preferential Treatment,” coauthored with Uma Narayan, was republished in Hugh LaFollette’s, Ethics in Practice, Blackwell Press (Oxford England), 3rd edition, 2006.  For the academic year of 2008/2009, Prof. Harris was nominated a senior fellow at the Stanford Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity. During his residency, one of his scholarly projects will be the completion of a book entitled, The Meaning of Equality in “Post-Apartheid” America.

Saul Sarabia (US)

Sarabia currently serves as the Director of the Law School’s Critical Race Studies Concentration.   Previously he served as a Program Director at the UCLA Center for the Study of Urban Poverty, working with transnational social change activists.  He has served as a Program Director at the Community Coalition in South Central Los Angeles  and as an Advocate at the Central American Human Rights Commission in San Jose, Costa Rica.  His community-based social justice advocacy has ranged from documenting human rights violations in Central American countries to community organizing with poor people on welfare and in the foster care system in Los Angeles.

He has written numerous articles which have been published worldwide on a host of issues affecting Latinos living in the United States and in Latin American countries.

Contributors

Manjula Pradeep (Delegation Leader India)

Manjula Pradeep was born into a conservative Indian family.   Women played a subservient role in her family , and were always dependent on the men.  As the second daughter , Manjula was not welcomed as her father was expecting a son.  In her childhood , Manjula saw her mother being physically and mentally abused by her father.  She dreamt of seeing her mother liberated from her father’s abuse and torture.

As she was growing up , Manjula could see that she and her siblings were treated differently in the neighborhood and in their schools. She realized what her parents were insecure to reveal – that they were Dalits , i.e. , “untouchables”.

Manjula made up her mind to do something unique and unusual – so that she would not be despised and treated differently by anyone. “Having suffered discrimination based on caste and gender I was motivated to do something which can bring significant change in the lives of my community and especially women ,” she says “although I knew that the path which I have taken is full of struggles , frustrations and loneliness.”

Manjula graduated from college and in 1992 became the first female employee of Navsarjan. During the time she worked as an employee of Navsarjan , Manjula acquired a law degree , served as an Advocacy Fellow at the Advocacy Institute in Washington , D.C. (1997) , and completed leadership training at the Global Women’s Leadership Institute in New Jersey (2002).  She joined in delegations to the World Conference against Racism in 2001 , the World Social Forum 2004 , and has trained hundreds of activists in India to participate in international forums and local rallies.  In 2004 Manjula was appointed Navsarjan’s Executive Director , succeeding founder Martin Macwan.

Gagan Sethi (Delegation Leader India)

Martin Macwan (Delegation Leader India)

As the 2nd born child of a poor Dalit family of 11 children in Nadiad, Martin Macwan was both deserving and fortunate enough to attend college and graduate in 1980 from Gujarat University with a degree in psychology. Two years later, he added a law degree from S.P. University to his curriculum.  Ever since the end of his studies, he has worked extensively on the issues of rights and social justice for the minorities, be it with the Marijanas –a refugee tribe from Pakistan settled in the northern District of Banaskantha– or the tribals of Bharuch District in South Gujarat.

Between 1980 and 1982, and again between 1985 and 1989, Martin Macwan taught and worked for the Behavioral Science Centre of Ahmedabad, addressing the problems of economic and social exploitation of the Dalits, and raising awareness among their communities. Following the tragic event of Golana, he set up Navsarjan as a charitable Trust in 1988 with the intent to pursue and intensify his fight to eradicate caste discrimination.

Martin Macwan has been involved intensively with the Dalit movement both at the international and national level. As National Convenor of the National Campaign on Dalit Human Rights (NCDHR) between 1999 and 2001, he led the Indian Dalit contingent to the World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance (WCAR) in Durban. Treasurer and founding trustee of the National Centre for Advocacy Studies, winner of the 2000 Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award & recipient of Gleitsman Foundation’s Activist of the Year Award, he has also been honored by Human Rights Watch.

Jurema Werneck (Delegation Leader Brazil)

Jurema Werneck is a Black feminist activist and coordinator of the Criola organization –  a Black Women’s NGO in Rio de Janeiro. As a medical doctor, Jurema is an active speaker on and has written extensively about issues of great concern of the Black movement such as Black population health and public policy, specifically Brazilian Black women’s health, gender and race-based affirmative action.

Eliane Cavalleiro (Delegation Leader Brazil)

Rosangela Malachias (Delegation Leader Brazil)

Cheryl Harris

Professor Harris began her teaching career at Chicago-Kent College of Law in 1990, after more than a decade in practice that included criminal appellate and trial work and municipal government representation as a senior attorney for the city of Chicago. As the National Co-Chair for the National Conference of Black Lawyers for several years, she developed expertise in international human rights, particularly concerning South Africa. Professor Harris was a key organizer of several major conferences both in South Africa and in the United States that helped establish a dialogue between U.S. legal scholars and South African lawyers during the development of South Africa’s first democratic constitution in 1994.

She is the author of leading works in Critical Race Theory including the highly influential Whiteness as Property (Harv. L. Rev.). Her work has also taken up the relationship among race, gender and property and most recently has focused on race, equality and the Constitution through the re-examination of Plessy v. Ferguson and Grutter v. Bollinger.

In 2002 Professor Harris received a fellowship from the Mellon Foundation to co-host a semester long interdisciplinary working group and conference series on “Redress in Social Thought, Law and Literature,” at the University of California Humanities Research Institute. She is a member of the Advisory Board of the Bunche Center for African-American Studies and is part of the Executive Council of the American Studies Association. Professor Harris is the recipient of the ACLU Foundation of Southern California 2005 Distinguished Professor Award for Civil Rights Education.

Devon Carbado

Devon Carbado, who recently served as the Vice Dean of the Faculty, teaches Constitutional Criminal Procedure, Constitutional Law, Critical Race Theory, and Criminal Adjudication. He was elected Professor of the Year by the UCLA School of Law Classes of 2000 and 2006, is the 2003 recipient of the Rutter Award for Excellence in Teaching, and was recently awarded the University Distinguished Teaching Award, The Eby Award for the Art of Teaching. He is a recipient of the Fletcher Foundation Fellowship, which modeled on the Guggenheims, is awarded to scholars whose work furthers the goals of Brown v. Board of Education.Professor Carbado graduated from Harvard Law School in 1994. At Harvard, he was the Editor-in-Chief of The Harvard Black Letter Law Journal, a member of the Board of Student Advisors, and winner of the Northeast Frederick Douglass Moot Court Competition. After receiving his law degree, he joined Latham & Watkins in Los Angeles as an associate before his appointment as a Faculty Fellow and Visiting Associate Professor of Law at the University of Iowa College of Law.

Professor Carbado writes in the areas of critical race theory, employment discrimination, criminal procedure, constitutional law, and identity. He is editor of Race Law Stories (Foundation Press) (with Rachel Moran) and is working on a book on employment discrimination tentatively titled “Acting White” (Oxford University Press) (with Mitu Gulati). He is a former director of the Critical Race Studies Program at UCLA Law, a faculty associate of the Ralph J. Bunche Center for African American Studies, a board member of the African American Policy Forum and a James Town Fellow.

George Lipsitz

George Lipsitz studies social movements, urban culture, and inequality. His books include The Possessive Investment in Whiteness, A Life in the Struggle: Ivory Perry and the Culture of Opposition, Dangerous Crossroads, and Time Passages. Lipsitz received his Ph.d in History at the University of Wisconsin and has been active in struggles for fair housing and educational equity.

Jerry Kang

Professor Jerry Kang’s teachings and reserach interests include civil procedure, race, and communications. On race, he has focused on the nexus between implicit bias and the law, with the goal of advancing a “behaviorial realism” that imports new scientific findings from the mind sciences into legal discourse and policymaking. He is also an expert on Asian American communities, and has written about hate crimes, affirmative action, the Japanese American internment, and its lessons for the “War on Terror.” He is a co-author of Race, Rights, and Reparation: The Law and the Japanese American Internment (Aspen 2001).

On communications, Professor Kang has published on the topics of privacy, pervasive computing, mass media policy, and cyber-race (the techno-social construction of race in cyberspace). He is also the author of Communications Law & Policy:   Cases and Materials (3rd edition Foundation 2008), a leading casebook in the field. His work regularly appears in leading journals, such as the UCLA, Stanford, and Harvard Law Reviews.

During law school, Professor Kang was a supervising editor of the Harvard Law Review and Special Assistant to Harvard University’s Advisory Committee on Free Speech. After graduation, he clerked for Judge William A. Norris of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals, then worked at the National Telecommunications and Information Administration on cyberspace policy.

He joined UCLA in Fall 1995 and was elected Professor of the Year in 1998 and received the Rutter Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2007. At UCLA, he helped found the Concentration for Critical Race Studies, the first program of its kind in American legal education and acted as its founding co-director for two years. He resumed leadership of the program in 2007.  During 2003-05, Prof. Kang visited at both Georgetown Law Center and Harvard Law School.

Prof. Kang is a member of the American Law Institute, has chaired the American Association of Law School’s Section on Defamation and Privacy, serves on the Board of Directors of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, and has received numerous awards including the World Technology Award for Law and the Vice President’s “ Hammer Award ” for Reinventing Government.

Mark Sawyer

Mark Sawyer is currently an Associate Professor of African American Studies and Political Science at UCLA and the Director of the Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity and Politics. In fall of 2005 he was a Visiting Associate Professor at the Department of African and African-American Studies at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Chicago in December of 1999.

His current work includes a book entitled, ” Racial Politics in Post Revolutionary Cuba” that was recently published by Cambridge University press.  His book received the DuBois Award for the best book by the National Conference of Black Political Scientists and the Ralph Bunche Award from the American Political Science Association. He has written articles on the intersection between race and gender in modern Cuba, Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic and additional work on the impact of race relations on democratic transition in Cuba.  He also has interest in the area of race, immigration and citizenship around the globe. He has published in the Journal of Political Psychology, Perspectives on Politics, SOULS, as well as the UCLA Journal of International and Foreign Affairs. He is a member of the American Political Science Association, and the National Conference of Black Political Scientists

Russell Robinson

Russell Robinson is an Acting Professor at UCLA School of Law. Robinson graduated with honors from Harvard Law School (1998), after receiving his B.A. summa cum laude from Hampton University (1995). Robinson clerked for Judge Dorothy Nelson of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals (1998-99) and for Justice Stephen Breyer of the U.S. Supreme Court (2000-01). He has also worked for the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Legal Counsel (1999-2000) and the firm of Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer and Feld in Los Angeles, practicing entertainment law (2001-02). He was a Visiting Professor at Fordham Law School (2003-04).

Robinson’s current scholarly and teaching interests include antidiscrimination law, law and psychology, race and sexuality, and media and entertainment law. His publications include: Casting and Caste-ing: Reconciling Artistic Freedom and Antidiscrimination Norms, 95 Cal L. Rev. 1 (2007); Uncovering Covering, 101 Nw. U. L. Rev. 1809 (2007); Perceptual Segregation, 108 Colum. L. Rev. __ (2008); Structural Dimensions of Romantic Preferences, 76 Fordham L. Rev. __ (2008).  He is also working on an article entitled Racinig the Closet and an article entitled Masculinity as Prison.

Christian Davenport

Professor Christian Davenport’s research interests include political conflict, measurement, and racism. Between 1999 and 2008, he was on the faculty of the University of Maryland, where he directed the Minorities at Risk Data Project. He earned his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Binghamton in 1992.

Among Davenport’s publications are State Repression and the Domestic Democratic Peace (Cambridge University Press, 2007) and Media Bias and State Repression: The Black Panther Party (forthcoming from Cambridge University Press). He also is the editor of two books: Repression and Mobilization (University of Minnesota Press, 2004), and Paths to State Repression: Human Rights Violations and Contentious Politics (Rowman & Littlefield, 2000). His articles have appeared in the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, the Journal of Politics, the Journal of Conflict Resolution, Political Research Quarterly, Comparative Political Studies, and the Monthly Review.

Davenport has held visiting appointments at the Transitional Justice Institute at the University of Ulster, Ireland; the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Studies at Stanford University; and the Peace Research Institute in Oslo, Norway. He is working on various projects involving state-dissident interactions in the United States, Rwanda, India, and Northern Ireland.

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